PROJECT GREENSAND

    Project Greensand is maturing one of the most progressed carbon capture and storage projects inside Danish jurisdiction and targets the development of CO2 storage capacity offshore Denmark based on reusing discontinued offshore oil and gas fields for permanent CO2 storage.

    Project Greensand aims to validate technical and commercial feasibility of CO2 storage in the Danish part of the North Sea

    Project Greensand is currently validating the technical and commercial feasibility of permanent CO2 storage in depleted oil and gas reservoirs in the danish part of the North Sea, starting with the Nini Field.

    The project has received support from the Energy Technology Development and Demonstration Program (EUDP) via the Danish Energy Agency, to conduct all the initial technical validation studies. The study was kicked of in June 2020 and will be finalized end of 2021.

    The project aims at building infrastructure and capabilities that will enable CO2 captured in onshore facilities to be transported offshore for injection and storage beneath the seabed. 

    The knowledge from the project can be used to later scale up the entire site to 3.5mill tonnes of CO2 per year capacity. Contributing to 15-20% of Denmark’s carbon reduction target. Becoming the first mega storage site in Denmark. CCS is a technology that supports decarbonisation of several industries by capturing up to 90% of carbon emissions and storing it in underground.

    Project Greensand is led by INEOS Oil & Gas Denmark and has two other commercial partners, Wintershall DEA and Maersk Driling. The project have GEUS (Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland) as research partner.

    Greensand in the news

    Project Greensand: North Sea reservoir and infrastructure certified for CO2 storage

    The mission to store CO2 beneath the Danish North Sea has cleared the first major hurdle after the intended subsea reservoir was confirmed feasible for CO2 injection by independent certification body DNV GL to the endorsement of Danish authorities.

    First Lab results are very promising

    The consortium partners, INEOS O&G DK, Wintershall Dea, Maersk Drilling and GEUS as a research partner, are conducting thorough scientific testing on discontinued oil & gas fields in Denmark to answer the critical question: Can CO2 be safely & permanently stored underneath the seabed?

    Project Greensand Kick-off

    In June, Maersk Drilling kicked-off Project Greensand together with INEOS Oil & Gas Denmark and Wintershall Dea. This CCS initiative aims at repurposing existing oil and gas facilities for CO2 storage beneath the danish part of the North Sea.

    The project has received funding from EUDP for a study to validate the technical and commercial feasibility of the project.

    Maersk Drilling joins Danish offshore CO2 storage consortium

    Maersk Drilling is joining a new CO2 storage consortium formed by INEOS Oil & Gas Denmark and Wintershall Dea. The consortium is maturing one of the most progressed carbon capture and storage projects inside Danish jurisdiction and targets the development of CO2 storage capacity offshore Denmark based on reusing discontinued offshore oil and gas fields for permanent CO2 storage.

    SPE Webinar with Project Greensand

    Want to learn more about Project Greensand?

    On the 15th of December 2020, Project Greensand was presented at a virtual SPE Copenhagen meeting. The presentation was hosted by Johan Byskov Svendsen from INEOS Oil & Gas Denmark and Jeanne Mia Lønstrup from Maersk Drilling. Around 130 people participated in the virtual presentation followed by many interesting questions

    Greensand at a glance

    Partners

    INEOS Oil & Gas Denmark, Wintershall Dea, Maersk Drilling and GEUS

    Current focus

    Offshore CO2 storage and transportation

    Location

    Danish North Sea, Nini West field

    Injection start

    2025 with a volume of approx 0.5 million tonnes of CO2 per year

    Storage capacity

    3.5-4 million tonnes of CO2 per year in 2030

    Project Greensand – A Danish ‘Mega’ CO2 Storage Site?